Dr. Brian D Shaw

shaw

Associate Professor, Fungal Biology
320B LF Peterson
office: 979-862-7518
fax:     979-845-6483
skype: brian.d.shaw
bdshaw@tamu.edu

Education

Post-Doctoral: University of Georgia
Ph.D.: Plant Pathology, Cornell University
BA: Michigan State University

Research Emphasis:

Fungal Developmental Biology

1) Roles of Cytoskeleton and Endocytosis in Hyphal Growth

Filamentous fungi are defined by the ability to form highly polarized hyphae that invade and colonize substrates. Polarized hyphal growth requires the formation of a stable polarity axis that confines cell wall deposition to a discrete cortical site. Axis formation is presumably triggered by positional signals that locally regulate the organization of the cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking machinery.  Recent work has suggested that a balance between endocytosis and excytosis must be maintained at the cell apex for growth to occur.  Understanding the mechanisms behind this interplay will lead to insights in how cell shape is determined.

2) Evolution of Conidiation

Fungal asexual sporulation (conidiation) provides a mechanism for dispersal and dormancy. This developmental process is widespread among the Ascomycete fungi. We are testing models for the evolution of this dispersal process. There is evidence for sporulation in a common ancestor that has been modified to give rise to the variety of form and function seen in the modern lineages of the Ascomycetes. At the same time there is evidence that conidiation has evolved to use lineage-specific regulators, such that different regulatory genes were recruited to control conidial morphogenesis in different fungal lineages. Our hypothesis is that both divergent and convergent evolution have contributed to the genetic pathways governing conidiation.

3) Characterization of Virulence Mechanism in Pathogenic Fungi Associated with Maize Stalk Rot

Stalk rot is the most devastating disease of maize in the US. Despite the significance of the problems due to stalk rots, we have gained little ground in understanding this complex disease. Studies conducted by the PI demonstrated that Fsr1, a multimodular protein in stalk rot pathogen Fusarium verticillioides, is a virulence determinant that regulates host recognition and pathogenesis in maize-pathogen interaction. The long-term goal of this research project is to identify fungal genes and pathways associated with stalk rot pathogenesis. The Fsr1-mediated virulence in F. verticillioides provides a unique opportunity to explore the novel signaling mechanism that controls virulence in maize stalk rot pathogens. Our central hypothesis is that Fsr1 regulates virulence in maize stalk rot pathogens. The aims of this proposal are i) to characterize a novel virulence mechanism in F. verticillioides that is involved in Fusarium stalk rot pathogenesis and ii) to demonstrate that this virulence mechanism is conserved in another stalk rot pathogen, Colletotrichum graminicola. This research will provide new avenues for investigating the virulence mechanisms in pathogenic fungi, which will in turn impact the potential for innovative management strategies.

4) Roles of Cytoskeleton and Endocytosis in Hyphal Growth

Filamentous fungi are defined by the ability to form highly polarized hyphae that invade and colonize substrates. Polarized hyphal growth requires the formation of a stable polarity axis that confines cell wall deposition to a discrete cortical site. Axis formation is presumably triggered by positional signals that locally regulate the organization of the cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking machinery.  Recent work has suggested that a balance between endocytosis and excytosis must be maintained at the cell apex for growth to occur.  Understanding the mechanisms behind this interplay will lead to insights in how cell shape is determined.

 

Teaching

BESC204 Molds and Mushrooms: The Impact of Fungi on Society and the Environment

PLPA632 Fungi: Cell Biology and Taxonomy

PLPA631 Fungi: Laboratory

 

Recent Publications

B. D. Shaw, Da-Woon Chung, Chih-Li Wang; Laura A. Quintanilla and Srijana Upadhyay. 2011.  A Role for Endocytic Cycling in Hyphal Growth.  Fungal Biology 115: 541-546. (Link)

D.-W. Chung, C. Greenwald, S. Upadhyay, S. Ding, H. H. Wilkinson, D. J. Ebbole, and B. D. Shaw. 2011. acon-3, the Neurospora crassa ortholog of the developmental modifier, medA, complements the conidiation defect of the Aspergillus nidulans mutant. Fungal Genetics and Biology. 48: 370-376. (Link)

C. J. Greenwald, T. Kasuga, N. L. Glass, B. D. Shaw, D. J. Ebbole, and  H. H. Wilkinson.  2010. Temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression during asexual development of Neurospora crassa. Genetics. 2010 186: 1217–1230.  (Link)

C. Wang, W.-B. Shim, and B. D. Shaw. 2010. The Aspergillus nidulans striatin ortholog is required for sexual development. Fungal Genetics and Biology. 47: 789-799. (Link)

S. C. Lee, S. N. Schmidtke, L. J. Dangott and B. D. Shaw. 2008. Aspergillus nidulans ArfB is linked to endocytosis and polarized growth. Eukaryotic Cell.  7: 1278-1288  (Link)

Q.-M. Qin, J. Pei, V. Ancona, B. D. Shaw, T. A. Ficht, and P. de Figueiredo. 2008. RNAi Screen of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Host Factors Reveals a Role for  IRE1 in Supporting Brucella Replication. PLOS Pathogens. 4:e100011. (Link)

S. C. Lee and B. D. Shaw. 2008.  ArfB links protein lipidation and endocysosis to polarized growth of Aspergillus nidulans. Communicative and Integrative Biology  1: 51-52. (Link)

S. C. Lee and B. D. Shaw. 2008. Localization and function of ADP ribosylation factor A in Aspergillus nidulans. FEMS Microbiology Letters 283: 216-222. (Link)

S. Upadhyay, and B. D. Shaw. 2008. The Role of actin, fimbrin, and endocytosis in growth of hyphae in Aspergillus nidulansMolecular Microbiology 68: 690-705. (Link)

S.  Sukno, V. M. García, B. D. Shaw, and M. R. Thon.  2008. Root infection and systemic colonization of maize by Colletotrichum graminicolaApplied and Environmental Microbiology 74: 823-832. (Link)

U. Sagaram, B. D. Shaw, and W.-B. Shim. 2007.  Fusarium verticillioides GAP1, a gene encoding a putative glycolipid-anchored surface protein, participates in conidiation and cell wall structure but not virulence. Microbiology 153: 2850-2861. (Link)

S. C. Lee and B. D. Shaw. 2007.  A novel interaction between N-myristoylation and the 26S proteasome during cell morphogenesis. Molecular Microbiology 63: 1039-1053. (Link)

B. D. Shaw and H. C. Hoch. 2007.  Regulation of fungal growth and development by ions.  In: The Mycota vol. VIII edition 2: Biology of the Fungal Cell. Springer Verlag. 219-236.

Comments are closed.